“ Late Night”

Emma Thompson and Mindy Kaling team up for a comedic drama about women coexisting in the field of late night tv hosting, a field dominated by men. Thompson, as Katharine Newbury, has been hosting her own show for twenty-eight years. Her gig is getting stale, and the head of the network, Caroline Moran ( Amy Ryan) is ready to dump her. Too many interviews with Doris Kearns Goodwin brings on the line that Goodwin could be an Avenger if she tried! Moran also scoffs at a ” folded fitted sheet race” segment. All the criticism leads Katharine to mock a viral video of dog butt sniffing which itself goes horribly viral.

Most of the screen time is showing us who Newbury is. A rather snobbish, direct and tough woman, who eschews social media and protégées. ” I will not allow you to destroy the show I built.” sounds much tougher than the easy compromising she exhibits. She takes no time in calling her surprising three year affair ” reprehensible”. We never learn what becomes of “Charlie”. John Lithgow plays Katharine’s forgiving husband.

Mindy Kaling, the first Indian-American to have her own show, plays Molly. Molly works at a chemical plant , but is obsessed with comedy. Molly is hired to prove that Katharine does not hate women and to diversify the all thirtyish- something male fifedom. One of the funniest lines is Molly saying that she is not worried about the masculinity in the room. Many of the writers are obviously gay.

Many of the jokes are based on appearances. Katharine’s spikey hair is challenged by her black publicist. ” How do you feel about extensions?” Molly attends a party with the tags still on her dress. The monologues could be funnier, and viewers are dragged through Molly watching old stand-ups and gazing at the accolade room full of Golden Globes and Emmies. Katharine tells Molly that her earnestness is hard to be around. The suspiciousness of the famous is well documented. Slut shaming is addressed, as is selfishness. While Katharine is often unusually cruel, her complacency is what has driven her ratings down. Caroline tells Katharine to “give a damn” and the two strike a deal. The jokes, the growth, the women karma did not seem that fresh to me.

“A Wrinkle In Time”

Madeleine L’ Engle 1962 s sci-fi teen novel is put to the big screen with only some success.  Ava Du Vernay directs Oprah Winfrey, Mindy Kaling, and Reese Witherspoon in the tale that champions love of self, love of family, and love of humanity. These three celestial beings are a tad didactic and full of pep talks and positive and supportive voicings. “ Love is always there even if you can’t feel it” is pretty hope-filled. Given that the age of most viewers will be from second to sixth grade is a wrap, but subtlety would have won out, I think.

Our protagonist, Meg Murray, is played stunningly by Storm Reid. She will become a role model for many young girls, and it is cool to have the “mean girls” learn that they are the crazies.

Reading, science, and intelligence are trumpeted, which are good things. The philosophy of “ staying focused on the light when dark approaches” holds forth, too. Evil is acknowledged: centering oneself is a must. Fear turns to rage which, in turn, turns to violence. Imaginative warriors are needed. Models of great earth warriors are Einstein, Mandela, and Ghandi.

Charles Wallace (Meg’s younger , genius brother) and she must make a plan to rescue their father. They are given three gifts to aid them: a magnifying glass to see what is enfolded, the gift of your faults, and a command to stay together.

Aninated scenes are colorful and the cabbage ride being my favorite. The pre-teen love interest of Calvin will keep middle schoolers giggling. And “abandoned children” everywhere will toughen up. Enjoy the quotations and the credits given; and parents who want to “ shake hands with the universe”, remember to hold your children’s hands, too. Message heavy this film is.